Froggy Umbrella Applique Block

When Bug was just a wee lad, he was in love with his frog umbrella. You'd never hear him complain on a rainy day because out came "Froggy" and together the 2 would brave the elements. Bug was also known to tote Froggy on sunny days, too. You just can't spend enough time with a good friend, can you?

Bug still has Froggy, but he's gotten to the age when he's more apt to make a mad dash to his destination in the rain rather than take the time for a leisurely walk with his frog. So, let's call this my ode to Froggy Umbrella. He served Bug well!


As with all blocks, our Froggy Umbrella Applique was designed for a 6" x 6" block, but can be reduced or enlarged to meet your needs. Enjoy!

The pattern for the FREE Froggy Umbrella Applique Block can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Enlarge and Reduce can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Cut Out Felt can be found HERE.

The Stitching Glossary can be found HERE.

Refer to pattern and photo for applique placements and cutting instructions.

Make a copy of the pattern.

Cut out felt using the pattern as a guide. Transfer any embroidery markings.

Using a running stitch, sew eyes to block using 2 strands of floss.

Using a running stitch, sew umbrella cane to block using 2 strands floss.

Using a blanket stitch, sew umbrella section "a" to block using 3 strands floss. Note: Where section "a" will be covered by umbrella sections "b" and "c", use a running stitch. 

Using a blanket stitch, sew umbrella sections "b" and "c" over umbrella section "a" using 3 strands floss.

Using a running stitch, sew cheeks to umbrella using 2 strands floss.

Using a running stitch, sew irises to eyes using 2 strands floss.

Using a running stitch, sew handle to cane using 2 strands floss.

Using a stem stitch, add  mouth using 6 strands floss.

Add French knots to section points using 6 strands floss.
 

Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved. Please do not reproduce our text, images or patterns without prior written consent. Please contact us with any questions.


Photo 1-7-10

 

State Studies Unit 1 :: Week 2 New England

This is an outline of our State Studies Unit 1 :: Week 2 New England States. It is the second week of a 9 week homeschool unit. Read the State Studies Unit Overview to learn more about the program and catch up on past weeks.


Public Domain Image

Read about:
Massachusetts, MA, Boston
Rhode Island, RI, Providence
Connecticut, CT, Hartford
in Our Fifty States and The United States of America.

Map: Add the 3 new states to your United States Study Map. We color New England States light blue. They are colored coded on the quizzes. Number the states on the map to coincide with your state list (it gets too hard to fit all the state names directly on the map).

Color: Dover Coloring book page or State Information Page (coming soon) for each state. We like to add a couple of extra notes about the state in the margins. These are things that we learned about in our readings. Again we color New England States light blue.

Community Enrichment Book: Going Lobstering

Community Life Book: Life in a Fishing Community pages 12-23

Activity Page: I have made these for the first few weeks of the unit but I'm not sure if I will continue them making. Let me know if you like them. I've used these to go along with the Community Enrichment Books. This week it is about lobster buoys.

Read Aloud: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankeweiler chapters 4-6

Student Reader (3-4 grade): Windcatcher chapters 8-15

Narration: Complete a narration on either Going Lobstering or your student's daily reading from Windcatcher. You can use the Reading Journal or any of the other free Journal Page that you would like. If you need help with learning how to incorporate narrations into your studies, I recommend the book The Complete Writer: Writing With Ease. The Reading Journal includes space for your student to choose several words from his reading that were unfamiliar to him to use as vocabulary words.

Copywork: Use sentences from Going Lobstering or the Mixed-Up Files for copywork.

Art Project: Painting Cork Buoys

Cooking: Make the recipe from The United States Cookbook: Boston Baked Beans

Picture Study: Choose 1 image from Come Look With Me: Art in Early America to study this week (we choose Capture of H.R.M. Frigate).

Poem for Memorization: You will have four weeks to memorize "The Sandpiper" by Witter Bynner. Try to learn one stanza per week.

State Quarters: Another fun activity to add to this unit is collecting Quarters from all 50 states. You can display them in a quarter map.

Quiz: Study the 3 states and capitals you have learned throughout the week. Your student should be able to identify each state on the map, along with its capital and postal abbreviation. You can use your map or flashcards to study.
Week 2 Map Quiz

If you are following along with us and completing the State Studies activities at home we would love to hear about your adventures. You can leave a comment here with a link to your blog. If you don't have a blog or just want to share more photos we would like invite you to join our Wee Folk Art Homeschool Flickr group. Have fun!
 

Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved. Please do not reproduce our text, images or patterns without prior written consent. Please contact us with any questions.

Photos MB 2/28-14-3/10-14

 

Jelly Roll Race Quilt :: Directions & Notes

Ok, so you may be asking... what is a Jelly Roll Race Quilt and how do you make a Jelly Roll Race Quilt in an hour, or so ;)?

This is part 2 of our 3 part Jelly Roll Race Quilt series. Be sure to read part 1 Jelly Roll Race Quilt :: Quilt in an Hour?! and part 3.

A standard Jelly Roll Race Quilt produces a quilt top that is approximately 50" x 64". It uses one 40 strip Jelly Roll Fabric collection, sewn into a single, super long strip, that is then folded in half and sew together along one edge, you cut the folded edge open and then repeat for a total of 5 seams. This doubles the width of the Jelly Roll quilt top each time, and cuts the length in half. You end up with a quilt top that is a series of offset strips that come together in a surprisingly fast and fun fashion. You can't really tell what it will look like until it is all done and you spread it out for the first time. It feels like quilt magic.

If you haven't tried to make a Jelly Roll Race Quilt... give it a go. I had a great time making mine and plan to make many more.

First, unroll your Jelly Roll. You can just use one strip after another as it comes in the roll, although my Jelly Roll, Moda Wrens & Friends had a couple of the exact same strips one after another and I didn't want to sew two of the same strip together so I sorted my jelly roll out by colors. Don't spend too much time worrying about the order of the strips! You have to give up pattern control with a Jelly Roll Race Quilt. Just trust that the fabric collection will come together in a fun way.

Many of the Jelly Roll Race Quilt images I found online showed sewing the strips together at a 45 degree angle. If you like that look, by all means do it. I prefer the way it looks with a straight seam and just sewed mine that way.

Note: all measurements assume a 1/4" seam allowance.

So sew all of your strips together into one super long, mega strip (approximately 1600 inches long - actually longer, but I'm rounding), right sides together. Don't cut the thread between seams, just grab and go.

Once all of your jelly roll strips are sewn into your mega strip, trim the thread between each section, cut off 18" of one side of the strip. This is very important to offset the seams! Just be sure to do it on only one side. Then accordion fold the mega strip to make it easier to manage. You can then separate the folded strip into two piles, one for each end of the strip.

Place the folded mega strip on your lap and pick up both ends. Lay the two ends on top of each other, right sides together, and sew them together along one edge. This first row will take seemingly ;) forever. When you get to the end, you will have to cut open the folded edge so your new double strip will lay open flat. Don't worry if this first row is twisted. Just cut the end open and untwist it. It will get easier to not twist the rows as you go along. You now have a two row strip that is approximately 800 inches long.

Repeat. Grab the two ends, right sides together, sew along one edge until you hit the end, and cut open the folded edge.

You should now have a strip that is 4 rows tall and approximately 400 inches long.

Repeat. Grab the two ends, right sides together, sew along one edge until you hit the end, and cut open the folded edge. You should now have a strip (that is not really a strip any more) that is 8 rows tall and approximately 200 inches long.

Repeat. Grab the two ends, right sides together, sew along one edge until you hit the end, and cut open the folded edge. You should now have a strip (that is definitely not a strip any more) that is 16 rows tall and approximately 100 inches long.

Repeat. Grab the two ends, right sides together, sew along one edge until you hit the end, and cut open the folded edge. You should now have a quilt top that is 32 rows tall and approximately 50 inches long.

You are now done! Open up your Jelly Roll Race Quilt top and enjoy the surprise.

So now you are thinking that was fun, but what if I want my Jelly Roll Race Quilt to be a different size? I had those exact same thoughts. The standard Jelly Roll Race Quilt, really only works for a throw quilt, or a full sized bed if you add a border. I did some more research, played with some numbers, and came up with a formula to change the quilt size. Click here if you want to change your Jelly Roll Quilt size (coming soon).

Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved. Please do not reproduce our text, images or patterns without prior written consent. Please contact us with any questions.

 

Mixed Media Sailboats

While learning about the New England states, we completed this fun mixed-media sailboat painting. It combines one of our favorite activities, wet on wet watercolor painting, with recycling easily found papers. I love how playful and whimsical the finished paintings turned out. Enjoy!

Materials:
11" x 15" 140lb watercolor paper (27.9 cm x 38.1cm 300g)
watercolor paints
brown paper bag
newspaper
paint brushes
glue sticks
painter's tape
water :)
optional - pattern which you can download HERE

Begin by taping your paper to your waterproof work surface. I used 1" painter's tape. I lined the tape up with the edge of the paper so it was only tape to the table at the corners. Rub your fingers over the tape to make sure it makes a good bond. You do not want paint seeping under the tape.

We used a wet on wet watercoloring technique. Begin by using a wide brush and getting your whole page wet.

Pick a blue, and water down the color. Using your wide brush, sweep on blue in long horizontal strokes. Make sure the brush is wet enough so the paint bleeds on the paper. Leave some white edges, especially in the top half which will be the sky.

Using an assortment of blues and greens, use wet sweeping horizontal strokes to make the sea. This should be about the bottom half of the paper.

Using an old brown paper bag, cut out 5 boats. These should be in varying sizes. Larger boats will be placed in the front of the painting, with smaller boats will be up closer to the horizon. (Explain the concept of "prospective" to children, and how things that are closer to us appear larger.) Everyone except 7 year old Pixie was able to free form cut boats. She was struggling so I drew boat shapes for her and she cut them out. I've included a pattern page which can be found HERE if you'd like some help with shapes :)

Next, cut out sails with sizes in proportion to the boats. Again, everyone but Pixie did this free hand, but you may wish to use the pattern.

Match the appropriate boats and sails and paint. Paint. Allow to dry. Try to keep them flat, but it they do roll, you can straighten them out when you glue them to the paper.

Position the boats and sails on your watercolored seascape.

Feel free to trim any boats or sails to get them to fit or for proper sizing. When ready, glue them to the watercolor paper using a glue stick.

Using a thin brush at detail to the painting including masts and birds with black and waves with blue.  Point out that the larger birds are closer.

Remove tape and hang you paintings!

We invite you to add photos of your kids' completed Mixed-Media Sailboat Paintings to our Wee Folk Art Kids :: Arts & Crafts Flickr group.

 


Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved. Please do not reproduce our text, images or patterns without prior written consent. You may use one or two images on your blog as long as you reference Wee Folk Art and share a direct link back to our page. Please contact us with any questions.

Photos: 2-24-14, 2-25-14

 

Postcards :: Yummy Yogurt

From our latest trip to see Little Lady and Little Guy. Thanks for the photos, Megs!
 

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