waldorf

Flower Fairies in the Garden

It's spring... that means it's time to revisit our Flower Fairies. Welcome back Flower Fairies!

If Fairy Dust is sprinkled on a flower as the last dew of morning evaporates, something magical happens... a Flower Fairy is born! If you are lucky enough to have Flower Fairies in your garden, then you already know that all of your plants seem to grow a little lovelier and their blooms seem to last a little longer… as if by magic!
 
Now, you can bring that magic indoors by crafting your own Flower Fairies. Long known to be great friends with the gnomes and woodland creatures, your Flower Fairies will easily join in the merry making with the rest of your wee folk.

Additional photos, free pattern and the TUTORIAL can be found HERE.


Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved.

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Paperclay Gnomes, Of Course!

When I was working on the Paperclay Leaves last week, I was absent-mindedly rolling some of the cut-away clay in my hands. Before I knew it, the blob was shaped into a peg form. Well, it took me about 3 seconds to decide to make some gnomes. What a shocker, right?

Anyway... I ran a copy of Wee Folk Art's Waldorf Style Gnomes, both the adult and the child patterns, pulled a couple wooden pegs out for sizing, and before I knew it, I had me a gaggle of gnomes. Well, actually, I had 2 gnomes with plans to create a gaggle :)

So, here are the directions to make your own Paperclay Gnomes. Note: I would not consider these to be children's toys. Although all the materials are non-toxic and child safe, they will break if played with in an exuberant manner... and I ask you... what child DOES NOT play exuberantly? BTW: You can use other clays to make this project, too.

It took a couple ounces of paperclay for each gnome.

Materials:

To Shape:

Make copies of the adult gnome and child gnome. Cut out the hat and cloak for each gnome. When cutting out the hat, cut the hat so you leave only a 1/4" beyond the overlap line. You will not need the body wrap.

If you have wooden pegs, you can use them as models. If not, you can use the illustrations on pattern pages for sizing. Roll out a body and a head.

Break a toothpick in half. Rub water on the top of the tube where the head will rest. Insert the half of a toothpick half way down into the center of the tube top.

Place the head on top, pushing gently and turning slightly back and forth to help the two surfaces of the clay to bind. Stand the gnome up, making sure the bottom is flat so the gnome is not leaning. Note: both of my gnomes lean a bit and that is fine! Just make sure it stands without falling.

Pat a piece of clay in your hand and roll like a pie crust. Lay the cloak pattern piece on the clay, and cut around the edge with a sharp knife.

Put the cloak on the gnome, overlapping the neck a bit. Put water on your finger and smooth the front making sure the cloak has stuck to itself and the gnome.

Cut the hat out of clay in the same manner. You will need to cut away a little bit of the 1/4" overlap near the top or you won't be able to fold the hat near the point.

Run a wet finger along the 1/4" overlap. Wrap the clay forming the hat. Smooth the seam inside and out. You can give a jaunty bend to hat if you'd like.

Run a wet finger in the inside rim of the hat and position on the gnome's head. Push gently along the rim to make sure it is secure.

Let the gnomes dry thoroughly. It took 3 days for mine. When dried, you can leave white and seal, or paint.

To Paint:

To begin with, I collected all the supplies I would be needing. Although you can use any paint on these, I wanted a translucent quality to the colors, so I used my Stockmar Watercolor Paints.

BTW... It is a good idea when working with the clay, to make a flat cookie that you can try paint colors on. Make sure you let it dry completely.

I began by painting the face.

Then I painted the hat and coat the same color, including the inside of the cloak. Like the leaves, I started with watered down color, and added more intense color for shading. I then painted the body and accented in the same manner.

Finally, I made a strong coffee... some for me and some for the gnomies :) I wanted to give the gnomes an aged looked so I brush coffee over the whole gnome.

When the gnome was dried, I seal it.

All done! You know you want to try this, right? Can't you imagine them tucked hither and yon in your house? Enjoy!

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2011. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Old World Wooden Gnomes Tutorial


The other day I shared our latest gnomes... the Old World Wooden Gnomes. In the past we've made Peg Gnomes, Knit Gnomes, Sewn Baby Gnome Dolls, and Michelle even designed Gnome Pillow Panels that you can buy from Spoonflower to sew and stuff. So, it only seems natural that we would eventually have gotten around to making wooden gnomes :)

NOTE: For general instructions on how to cut out wood, prepare it for finishing, then painting, and finishing, including the beeswax and olive oil finish recipe, check out the post HERE.


I made these from 1" ash, but you can use any medium or hardwood. Click here to download the Old World Wooden Gnome pattern. Begin by cutting the gnomes out of wood. As you will notice, they aren't perfect. The saw blade had a mind of its own, but that's okay. Even the wonky ones turned out cute :)

Although I've been working with wood for the past couple of years, and not nearly as often as I should to advance my skills significantly, I tried something new this project. I finally used the wood burner Michelle gave me for Christmas.

Trust me when I tell you I'm new to wood burning. So new I couldn't even figure how to get the tips off so I just used the one it came with! (BTW... I figured it out AFTER I was done with the project :) 

I transferred the pattern for wood burning to the wood using a pencil.



I then practiced on scrap wood. Yikes! Not as easy as I thought it was going to be!

I moved on to the "real thing" and wood burned the pieces. I did not do a perfect job, but I was reasonably certain... or at least hopeful, that it wouldn't matter when they were all done :)


When I was done wood burning the pieces, I erased the marks, then proceeded to painting.

As usual, I mixed up milk paints, and painted each a bit different. It was amazing how the burned lines made it easier to paint... the secret to "staying in the lines".


When they were dried, I finished them with my beeswax/olive oil.

They have such an Old World look to them. The wee ones pounced on them when they came over. I know I will be making a whole village!

REMEMBER: For general instructions on how to cut out wood, prepare it for finishing, then painting, and finishing, including the beeswax and olive oil finish recipe, check out the post HERE.

The actual pattern can be found HERE.

Hope you have fun and populate your house with a bunch of gnomie friends :)

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2011. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.


 

Soft Earth's World Giveaway Winner!


Thanks to one everyone that entered this giveaway from Enchanted World of Needle Felting. Marie's work is so soft and peaceful, that it would be a joy to own anything she makes :) So, of course, we would like to thank Marie for her talents and generosity. And now... the winner is...

Submitted by This Cosy Life (Julie) on Fri, 06/24/2011 - 07:46.

Marie's work is simply magical and she is the absolute sweetest! I have been eyeing the spring, Seeds of Life fairies for a while. They are gorgeous!

Congratulations, Julie! We hope your family cherishes this lovely journal. Please email us at weefolkart@yahoo.com with your snail mail address so Marie can ship you the journal. If we do not hear from you in 1 week, a new winner will be selected.

Thanks again to Marie, for being a guest blogger on Wee Folk Art and for sponsoring this lovely giveaway. You can visit Marie's blog Soft Earth World or her Etsy shop Enchanted World of Needle Felting to keep up with her creative pursuits.

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