Felt & Felting

Spider Applique Block

Hopefully you won't find this spider going up your water spout! I designed this applique because Bug wanted more bugs in his life :) When we were making stamps for our Letterboxing Nature Journals, Bug wanted something that "boys like". He was quite smitten with the spider, and since that time, this spider has appeared many places. It was designed to fit a 6" x 6" block but can be enlarged or reduced to meet your needs. For tips on cutting out felt, check out our blog post HERE. The pattern for this spider can be found HERE. Enjoy!

DIRECTIONS - Refer to pattern and photo for applique placements and cutting instructions.

Make a copy of the pattern.

Cut out felt using the pattern. Transfer any embroidery markings.

Using a running stitch, sew legs and body to block using 2 strands floss.

Using a running stitch, sew back marking to spider's body using 2 strands floss.

French knot eyes to body using 6 strands floss.

Using a stem stitch, embroider web using 6 strands floss.

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2012. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights. Read our FAQs found HERE for specifics or contact us at weefolkart@yahoo.com if you have any questions.

Patterns may be used for personal use only. If you are interested in obtaining a Cottage Industry License so you can sell items made from our patterns, information can be found HERE.
 

PHOTO: 3-1-2010

Snail Applique Block

Although snails might not be welcomed visitors in your garden, they are certainly a sign of summer! And, if they are not ravishing your tender young plants, they are cute as... well, cute as a bug's ear :) I know the wee ones are fascinated with snails, and the geek in me always marvels at the the mathematical formula, The Fibonacci sequence, that is visible in the spiral in a snail's shell. [Want to know more about the Fibonacci sequence... and who doesn't... you can find info on it HERE. BTW... when I can't sleep at night, I often do the addition for the Fibonacci sequence... strange but true!]

ANYWAY... Fibonacci aside, I made this sweet little snail to fit a 6" x 6" block but it can be enlarged or reduced to meet your needs. Check out our tips for cutting out felt HERE. The pattern for our Snail Applique Block can be found HERE. Enjoy!

Next week we will share a project using our lovely little snail, just in time for your summer nature walks :)

DIRECTIONS:
Cut out felt. 

Sew grass to block. Use a blanket stitch and 3 strands of floss across the top of the grass and a running stitch and 2 strands of floss for sides and bottom.

Pin shell in place. Tuck the tail and head under the shell to the dotted lines. Sew on head and tail using a running stitch and 2 strands of floss.

Sew shell to block using a blanket stitch and 3 strands of floss around the outside edge of the shell and a running stitch and 2 strands of floss along the bottom of the shell.

Add detail to the shell using a stem stitch for the spiral and straight stitches for the lines. Use 6 strands of floss for both.

Using 6 strands of floss, add antennas and eyes.  Use a stem stitch for the curves and a French knot on the ends and eye.

Using a running stitch and 2 strands of floss, sew leaf to block. Add vein using a stem stitch and 6 strands of floss.

For each flower, position an outer circle on the grass using the pattern as a guide. Place an inner circle on top of the outer circle. Using a straight stitch, sew the buds to the block using 6 strands of floss. The stitching should just overlap the inner circle. Make 5 straight stitches. These stitches do not need to be evenly spaced. They should be slightly askew. Refer to photo.

Using a stem stitch, embroider flower stems and leaves using 6 strands of floss.

 

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2012. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights. Read our FAQs found HERE for specifics or contact us at weefolkart@yahoo.com if you have any questions.

Patterns may be used for personal use only. If you are interested in obtaining a Cottage Industry License so you can sell items made from our patterns, information can be found HERE.


 

Book Nook - Caps for Sale

EDIT: Yesterday a friend was over and shared a knitting book she had gotten from the library. She looked at one of the hat patterns and said "That reminds me of that kid's story about the peddler with the hats." Of course, I had to show her the toy I made a couple years ago. I haven't thought much about it lately, and decided it might be a great time to share again on Wee Folk Art. It has become one of the most beloved toys at Gammy's :)

"Once there was a peddler who sold caps. But he was not like an ordinary peddler, carrying his wares on his back. He carried them on top of his head." So begins the tale of Caps for Sale, the lovely story of an unorthodox peddler and a tree full of pesky monkeys! Written and illustrated by Russian author Esphyr Slobodkina in 1940, it has remained a favorite amongst children for generations. I can remember when my kindergarten teacher read this book to our class. I immediately feel in love and have reread it many times over the years. Although the list is long and mighty, I can honestly say, this was my very favorite book as a child. Why? 

I loved the absurdity of the book; a man balancing 17 caps on his head, monkey's in trees wearing hats, and the interplay between man and monkey! 

I also was empathetic to the peddler's loss. Can you imagine losing your wares to a bunch of renegade monkeys!  
 

Well, far be it from me to give away the end of the story, suffice to say, I've always been a sap for an "all's well that ends well" read. As a bit of an aside... the peddler's frustrated, and sometimes angry exclamation of, "You monkeys, you", became a favorite exclamation of mine as I was raising my children, although mine was uttered playfully, and usually followed by... "Move it, monkeys!"

Caps for Sale is a perfect story for children to act out. The plot is simple, and if you reduce the number of monkeys, the cast is small. To that end, I have crafted a set of characters and props to help your children extend the story to their own imaginative play. 

Met the peddler. Ready to take a little rest under a shady tree.

Met the monkeys. Ready for a little mischief and mayhem.

Feel the frustration of the peddler, bested by the monkeys!

 

 

And, feel the exhilaration brought on by an unlikely turn of events!

The directions on how to create your own Caps for Sale storybook characters can be found HERE. The directions for making the Autumn Tree can be found HERE. Enjoy! 

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2012. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights. Read our FAQs found HERE for specifics or contact us at weefolkart@yahoo.com if you have any questions.

Patterns may be used for personal use only. If you are interested in obtaining a Cottage Industry License so you can sell items made from our patterns, information can be found HERE.
 

Originally published: 2010-03-05 17:25:18 -0400

Painter's Palette Applique Block

FYI... Tim and I are off for a long weekend with Little Lady and her Mommy and Daddy. We will be back mid week. We hope everyone in the States has a wonderful and safe Memorial Day Weekend. And... if you're NOT in the States... we still hope you have a lovely weekend ;)

Do you have a budding artist in the family? (Perhaps it's you :) As you know, every artist needs a palette. Now, you can applique this palette to smocks, aprons, t-shirts or just about anywhere. I have a couple ideas of things I want to do with this design that I will share sometime next week. As always, this applique was made to fit a 6" x 6" block but can be enlarged or reduced to meet your needs. The pattern for the Painter's Palette Applique Block can be found HERE. Enjoy!

Appliqueing: Use 3 strands floss to blanket stitch palette to your block and use a running stitch and 2 strands floss to sew the paint blobs to the palette.
 

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2012. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights. Read our FAQs found HERE for specifics or contact us at weefolkart@yahoo.com if you have any questions.

Patterns may be used for personal use only. If you are interested in obtaining a Cottage Industry License so you can sell items made from our patterns, information can be found HERE.
 

Spring Big Gnomes for Wee Hands

When is the right time to bring fanciful gnomes into your child’s life? As soon as they are sitting up and ready to play, of course! Our Big Gnomes for Wee Hands were designed with our littlest ones in mind. The large bodies are easy for wee hands to grasp, and with no small parts, safe for supervised play. Make a pair (one for each hand, of course) or make all six in this series for a delightful Spring Rainbow of Big Gnomes!  

Our Big Gnomes for Wee Hands measures 6 1/2" x 1 1/2".

Note: Check the bottom of the page for a link to a different set of Big Gnomes.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR EACH LARGE GNOME:

Materials for Each Large Gnome:
Large Wooden Peg People - 3 9/16" x 1 1/8"
Wool felt in light and dark matching colors
Embroidery floss in coordinating colors
Crafting glue
Favorite stuffing material (optional)
Beeswax wood finish (optional)
Pattern

Note: All materials used should be non toxic and child safe.

READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE YOU BEGIN TO PREVENT MISUSE OF MATERIALS.

IMPORTANT: There can be significant variations in the sizes of the wooden pegs even from the same manufacture and even in the same shipment! Before cutting the body wraps out of felt, cut the pieces out of paper, and "try them on" your wooden pegs. Make adjustments to the paper pattern before cutting out your felt.

Directions:
Make a copy of the pattern.

Cut hat and cape out of the dark felt color and the body wrap out of the light felt color. Using the pattern and photo as a guide, cut out the applique pieces.

Check the peg to make sure the bottom is smooth. Occasionally, a little nub may remain on the bottom of a peg. If there is one, simply sand it off with a small piece of sandpaper or a nail file.

You may choose to finish the exposed parts of the wooden pegs with a beeswax polish. I love the rich look it gives the wood. Only finish the head, shoulder and base, not the area that will be glued. I use a small, hard bristle paint brush to get in the neck. This is an optional step. 


 
Glue body wrap to the wooden peg. Match the bottom edge of the wrap with the bottom edge of the wooden peg.

Add appliques and embroidery to the cape using the pattern as a guide. Blanket stitch the outer edge of the cape.

Using 2 strands of floss that match the cape, sew a running stitch close to the neck edge on the cap. DO NOT tie off.

Gather the running stitch slightly to make it fit around the peg's neck. The back of the cape should be centered with the back (the seamed edge) of the body wrap. Stitch closed at neck.

Lift the cape and in the center back, from the inside, tack the cape to the body wrap using 2 strands of matching thread. This will prevent the cape from turning during play.

Using 3 strands of contrasting floss, satin stitch a closure at the neckline.

Mark the overlap line on hat. Embroider the flowers using the pattern for placement.

Form the hat by matching the right edge of the hat piece with the overlap line. Pin together. Using 2 strands of matching floss, sew the hat together using a running stitch or blanket stitch. (I used a running stitch.)


 
Blanket stitch the lower edge of the hat using 3 strands of embroidery floss.


 
You can stuff the hat or leave it empty. If the gnome is going to be played with by very young children that will put the gnome in their mouth, I highly suggest you stuff the hat so it retains its shape. Using your favorite stuffing, stuff the inside of the hat stopping about 1/2" from the edge.

 
 
Place a line of crafting glue on the inside of the hat near the edge. Position the hat on the gnome tilting it slightly backward.
 

Give your Big Gnome a name and introduce him or her to some Wee hands!

Here is another set of Big Gnomes you may enjoy!


http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2012. All rights reserved.
 

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights. Read our FAQs found HERE for specifics or contact us at weefolkart@yahoo.com if you have any questions.

Patterns may be used for personal use only. If you are interested in obtaining a Cottage Industry License so you can sell items made from our patterns, information can be found HERE.

 

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