Felt & Felting

A Knight Needs a Mighty Steed

Just about ready to post the pattern for our Knights and Squires, BUT, how successful can a knight be without a mighty steed? With the help of The Red Knight and his Squire, I designed a horse, to be cut out of wood this weekend.

Starting next week, I will share the patterns and tutorials for making your own Knights, Squires and Steeds! Then, imagine the quests that will surely follow :) 


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Big Peg Owls for Wee Hands

A few weeks ago I shared a tutorial for making Peg Owls using an "adult" size, 2 3/8" x 7/8", wooden peg. Today, I am sharing a pattern for making a Large Peg Owl, perfect for wee hands, using the large wooden pegs, 3 9/16" x 1 1/8", making them large enough not to be a choke hazard. Basically, they are made the same as the smaller gnomes. The directions and patterns for those can be found HERE. Since I've shared the tutorial before, I'm not including as many photos. If you are at all confused by a step, just check out the other tutorial, and there will be more photos.

Materials:
Large Wooden Peg - 3 9/16" x 1 1/8" purchase HERE
Wool felt
Embroidery floss in coordinating colors
Crafting glue
Stuffing material
Batting - I used thin cotton batting
Pattern

READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE YOU BEGIN TO PREVENT MISUSE OF MATERIALS.

IMPORTANT: There can be significant variations in the sizes of the wooden pegs even from the same manufacture and even in the same shipment! Before cutting the body wraps out of felt, cut the pieces out of paper, and "try them on" your wooden pegs. Make adjustments to the paper pattern before cutting out your felt.

The pattern for the Owl Peg can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Cut Out Felt can be found HERE.

The Stitching Glossary can be found HERE.

NOTE: BECAUSE THIS TUTORIAL IS IDENTICAL TO THE PREVIOUS OWL PEGS, I DID NOT TAKE AS MANY PHOTOS. MANY STEPS IN THIS TUTORIAL ARE MISSING PHOTOS. CHECK OUT THE ORIGINAL TUTORIAL FOUND HERE WHERE ALL THE STEPS HAVE PHOTOS INCLUDED!

Directions:
Make a copy of the pattern.

Following the photo or your own imagination, cut out felt using the pattern.

Glue body wrap to the wooden peg. Match the bottom edge of the wrap with the bottom edge of the wooden peg.

Following the guidelines on the pattern, stitch appliques to owls body as follows:
-Stitch chest to body using a blanket stitch and 3 strands floss.
-Stitch beak to body using a running stitch and 2 strands floss.
-Stitch eyes to body using a blanket stitch and 3 strands floss.
-Add eye detail using a straight stitch and 6 strands of floss. If you would like, using the same piece of thread, you can tack down every other straight stitch in the center of the eye using a small stitch. This will help secure the stitches. (Please note: the pattern says "3 strands" of floss. I simply couldn't ask Michelle to make another PDF to fix it!)
-Add detail to the chest using a straight stitch and 6 strands of floss.

Now, with wrong sides together stitch the front of the owl's body to the back using a blanket stitch and 3 strands of floss.

Add the feather detail to the wing using a stem stitch and 3 strands of floss.

With wrong sides together, stitch a wing front to a wing back using a blanket stitch and 3 strands of floss. Only stitch the sides and bottom of the wing, DO NOT stitch the top of the wing above the "attach line". Refer to pattern. IMPORTANT: Do not cut thread!

Position a wing on the side of the owl. Use photos and patterns for positioning. Pin in place.

Using the same thread, continue blanket stitching the top of the wing, but now you will also be sewing it directly to the owl's body. Do the other wing in the same manner.

You are now done with the owl's body.

To attach the body to the peg, begin my cutting a strip of batting 1" wide. I used a thin cotton batting.

Depending on the thickness of your batting, wrap the batting strip around the peg to get the width you want. With my thin batting, I wrapped the peg twice. Cut off additional batting. Note: Use enough batting so when you slide the owl body over the peg, the owls chest is firmly stuffed. Before you glue the batting to the peg, "try the body on", by carefully sliding it over the batting, to make sure you are happy with the fit.

Place glue on the peg where the batting will go. Glue the batting to the peg. Note: If you are wrapping the peg twice, start wrapping the batting around the peg, then place more glue on the batting that is wrapped around the peg, and finish wrapping the peg. Press together and allow to dry completely before going on to the next step.

Using a small amount of stuffing, stuff the ears of the owl and place a little at the top of the head. When you place the body over the peg, you want the top of the owl's head to almost sit directly on the top of the peg. Do not over stuff!

Place glue on the batting and the top of the wooden peg and carefully slide the peg into the owl being careful not to get glue on the outside of the owl's body. Note: Position the peg so the seam of the body wrap is at the back of the owl.

Before glue dries, fuss with the owl's positioning, making sure the body is centered. Hold the owl's body against the peg until the glue begins to set. This should only tack a couple of minutes.

Allow to dry completely. Now, make a friend or two for your new owls and introduce them to your gnomes, fairies, and other woodland animals :)

 

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2013. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Rain Boot Applique Block

Statement: My floors are covered in mud. Period. End of story. As the near spring thaw begins to turn portions of our yard into a gooey brown viscous substance, my dogs joyously, nay, exuberantly, prance, dance and generally wallow in the stuff! Don't want this to be common knowledge, BUT, I've even tried dog boots. I think they ate them. Seriously. Or... they are buried somewhere in the yard, and I can just hear them snickering and nudging one another as they bound over the recent boot graves, proud of their clandestine tribulations.

So, no more dog boots. I've resigned myself to believing the mud on my floors is just another way of bringing the great outdoors inside. My floors will again be clean in the summer, but for now, I try not to begrudge them their joyous romps, and keep a mop handy, along with a good sense of humor.

Truth be told, although I'm willing to cut my dogs some slack when it comes to muddy paws, I don't have the same tolerance for humans. We can wipe our feet at the door, AND, wear awesome boots when we are outside. Rain boots have come a long way since I was a little girl. I remember these awful black buckled boots my brothers use to don, and as for me, my rain boots were always a solid colors and blah. Today, Holy Shmolies! There are so many awesomely cute rain boots out there, it rather saddens me when it is time to turn them in for sandals. (Mind you, I love my sandals, too!)  

Today, I am sharing an applique block for what I think are some awesomely cute rain boots. I can just imagine little feet, or big feet as the case may be, stomping in puddles and leaving footprints in mud. As always, this applique was designed to fit a 6" block, but can be enlarged or reduced to meet your needs. Whether you are getting ready for spring or anticipating fall rains, hope you find yourself in a pair of playful rain boots, stomping in standing pools of water and negotiating tempting mud puddles!

The pattern for the Rain Boots Applique Block can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Enlarge and Reduce can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Cut Out Felt can be found HERE.

The Stitching Glossary can be found HERE.
 

DIRECTIONS - Refer to pattern and photo for applique placements and cutting instructions.

Make a copy of the pattern.

Cut out felt. Transfer any embroidery markings.

Using a blanket stitch, sew boot to block using 3 strands floss.

Using a lazy daisy stitch, embroider flowers using 6 strands of floss. (Do not add flower centers yet.)

Using a running stitch, sew back handle to boot using 2 strands floss.

Using a blanket stitch, sew boot lining to boot using 3 strands floss.

Using a running stitch, sew front handle to boot using 2 strands floss.

Using a blanket stitch, attach cuff and sole to boot using 3 strands floss.

Using a French knot, embroider center of flowers using 6 strands floss.

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2013. All rights reserved.

 

Photo 1-7-10

 

Peg Owl Tutorial

Whoooo wants a couple of adorable owls to come stay at their house? I think the real question is Whoooo wouldn't :) Using traditional wooden pegs and felt, these little guys can take their place with your gnomes, fairies and other woodland animals. And, using our basic pattern, you can personalize these wee owls to suit your fancy. Make one or make a "parliament" of owls. This duet will fit easily into my travel bag when I go visit the wee ones in Wisconsin next week. I hope they like snow :)

Materials:
Wooden pegs - 2 3/8" x 7/8" 
Wool felt
Embroidery floss in coordinating colors
Crafting glue
Stuffing material
Batting - I used thin cotton batting
Pattern

READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE YOU BEGIN TO PREVENT MISUSE OF MATERIALS.

IMPORTANT: There can be significant variations in the sizes of the wooden pegs even from the same manufacture and even in the same shipment! Before cutting the body wraps out of felt, cut the pieces out of paper, and "try them on" your wooden pegs. Make adjustments to the paper pattern before cutting out your felt.

The pattern for the Owl Peg can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Cut Out Felt can be found HERE.

The Stitching Glossary can be found HERE.

Directions:
Make a copy of the pattern.

Following the photo or your own imagination, cut out felt using the pattern.

Glue body wrap to the wooden peg. Match the bottom edge of the wrap with the bottom edge of the wooden peg.

Following the guidelines on the pattern, stitch appliques to owls body as follows:
-Stitch chest to body using a blanket stitch and 3 strands floss.
-Stitch beak to body using a running stitch and 2 strands floss.
-Stitch eyes to body using a blanket stitch and 3 strands floss.
-Add eye detail using a straight stitch and 6 strands of floss. If you would like, using the same piece of thread, you can tack down every other straight stitch in the center of the eye using a small stitch. This will help secure the stitches. (Please note: the pattern says "3 strands" of floss. I simply couldn't ask Michelle to make another PDF to fix it!)
-Add detail to the chest using a straight stitch and 6 strands of floss.

Now, with wrong sides together stitch the front of the owl's body to the back using a blanket stitch and 3 strands of floss. 

Add the feather detail to the wing using a stem stitch and 3 strands of floss.

With wrong sides together, stitch a wing front to a wing back using a blanket stitch and 3 strands of floss. Only stitch the sides and bottom of the wing, DO NOT stitch the top of the wing above the "attach line". Refer to pattern. IMPORTANT: Do not cut thread! 

Position a wing on the side of the owl. Use photos and patterns for positioning. Pin in place.

Using the same thread, continue blanket stitching the top of the wing, but now you will also be sewing it directly to the owl's body. Do the other wing in the same manner.

You are now done with the owl's body.

To attach the body to the peg, begin my cutting a strip of batting 3/4" wide. I used a thin cotton batting.
 

Depending on the thickness of your batting, wrap the batting strip around the peg to get the width you want. With my thin batting, I wrapped the peg twice. Cut off additional batting. Note: Use enough batting so when you slide the owl body over the peg, the owls chest is firmly stuffed. Before you glue the batting to the peg, "try the body on", by carefully sliding it over the batting, to make sure you are happy with the fit.

Place glue on the peg where the batting will go. Glue the batting to the peg. Note: If you are wrapping the peg twice, start wrapping the batting around the peg, then place more glue on the batting that is wrapped around the peg, and finish wrapping the peg. Press together and allow to dry completely before going on to the next step.

Using a small amount of stuffing, stuff the ears of the owl and place a little at the top of the head. When you place the body over the peg, you want the top of the owl's head to almost sit directly on the top of the peg. Do not over stuff!

Place glue on the batting and the top of the wooden peg and carefully slide the peg into the owl being careful not to get glue on the outside of the owl's body. Note: Position the peg so the seam of the body wrap is at the back of the owl.

Before glue dries, fuss with the owl's positioning, making sure the body is centered. Hold the owl's body against the peg until the glue begins to set. This should only tack a couple of minutes.

Allow to dry completely. Now, make a friend or two for your new owls and introduce them to your gnomes, fairies, and other woodland animals :)


 

 

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2013. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Photos 2-21-13, 2-21-13

 

Cup of Cocoa Applique Block

With Valentine's Day quickly approaching, we are prompted to think about romantic love. But I must admit, I've never really bought into Valentine's Day. Don't get me wrong, I love romance, really, big fan of it, HOWEVER, I don't like "traditional holidays" that mandate romance. Getting flowers on Valentine's Day or Sweetest Day does nothing for me. I guess I'm as cynical as Lucy Van Pelt when she references Christmas, but I extend the message to Valentine's Day... "It's run by a big eastern syndicate you know." : ) No, to me, romance is when Tim brings me coffee in bed, sits next to me instead of across from me at restaurants so he can hold my hand, or when he works from home on days when I am sick so he can let the dogs out. Valentine's Day can't hold a candle to real, everyday romance for me.

That's not to say I don't appreciate Valentine's Day. I love the red and pink hearts, and take it as a gentle reminder to appreciate all the people we love. At Valentine's Day, I tend to think about all the friends that have touched me life. The friends that I have laughed and cried with, those that have remained over the decades, and those whose names have long since been forgotten. Each one has touched my heart, and I use Valentine's Day as a Memorial Day of the Heart : )

Yesterday I had the joy of connecting up with a friend I haven't chatted with in 10 years. As we sat around drinking coffee, I felt as at ease with her as ever. When we left Panera's, I realized we had talked for over 3 hours. Lovely! It is to all of my friends, past and present, that I thought about when I created this applique. I can think of no finer Valentine's gift than to be able to sit around with my friends, sharing, laughing and whiling away the hours. This yummy mug of hot cocoa... actually, for me it works to call it a frothy cappuccino, is meant to be shared with friends. That's why I'm sharing it with all of you : )

On to business : ) This applique block was created to fit a 6" x 6" block, but it can be enlarged or reduced to meet your needs. Enjoy : )
 
The pattern for the Cup of Cocoa Applique Block can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Enlarge and Reduce can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Cut Out Felt can be found HERE.

The Stitching Glossary can be found HERE.

DIRECTIONS - Refer to pattern and photo for applique placements and cutting instructions.

Make a copy of the pattern.

Cut out felt. Transfer any embroidery markings.

Using a blanket stitch, sew cup to block using 3 strands floss.

Using a stem stitch, add the cup lines using 6 strands floss.

Using a blanket stitch, sew the side edges of the bottom scalloped band using 3 strands floss.

Using a blanket stitch, sew the side edges of the top scalloped band using 3 strands floss.

Using a running stitch, sew handle to cup using 2 strands floss.

Add French knots in the center of each scallop of the two bands using 6 strands floss.

Using a blanket stitch, sew the whipped cream to the block using 3 strands floss.

Using a stem stitch, add whipped cream detail using 6 strands floss.

Using a straight stitch, add "sprinkles" to whipped cream using 6 strands floss.

Using a lazy daisy stitch, add flowers to cup lines using 6 strands floss.

Add French knots to the center of each flower using 6 strands floss.

 

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2013. All rights reserved.

PHOTO: 1-19-10

 

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