Being Given the Boot!

Just popping in to let you know Wee Folk Art will be quiet for the next week, which is more than I can say for my house! As we approach the end of our construction, I am being "booted" out of my office space (Thus the Boot Applique Block :) while they finish up work in my room.

Instead of trying to relocate my computer, I'll be using the next week to maintain sanity!!! And, when we do come back, hopefully we will be ready to unveil our new and improved site! Tim and Michelle have been working very hard, bringing us into the mobile device age! Our blog format will hopefully function better on mobile devices.

So... see everyone back here in a week!

BTW... The pattern and tutorial for the Rain Boot Applique Block can be found HERE.

Postcards :: The Spring Garden

 


Drew and Meghan's Wisconsin city garden.
Photo's from Meghan

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Unrequited Dreams

We often dream about doing "something", and it can remain a dream if we don't, in fact, actually do the thing we are dreaming about! No brainer, there, right?

But what actually pushes us from "dreaming" to "doing"? Sometimes, the answer is... inexplicable. You just wake up one day, and BOOM, there you are... set about pursuing your dream. Why today? No clue. I suppose it's just "time".

Sometimes you might receive the encouragement you need from a friend or you might see sometime that is the preverbal "final straw"... like a photo in a magazine or a documentary. And, sometimes the yearning just gets too great, and you have to act or burst.

Truly, few things are personally more disheartening than unrequited dreams. Perhaps a rather unlikely sage to quote, but Lucille Ball once said: "I'd rather regret the things I've done than regret the things I haven't done."

So, this morning, I'm think about all of us, and our dreams. Naturally, we can't just run off all "willy nilly" following every whim we have, but my hope for each of us this beautiful, sunny day, is that we can all take one step closer to pursuing an unrequited dream. ((hugs))

~Kimara~

As I've mentioned many times before, watercoloring has been an unrequited dream for 20 years! One day I got up and decided to finally get started. It has been a joy ever since!

Oil Pastel :: Zentangle Cows

Wisconsin is known for being America's Dairyland and we chose to highlight the cows this week. The kids had fun creating these silly cows and I love how each picture took on its own personality.

Note: Although I am using black marker to draw the cow, I started with a pencil, drawing very lightly. Then, I go back with marker. I am demonstrating with marker because it is easier to see, but begin by drawing with a pencil, then go back and trace with a marker.

Drew a large oval in the middle of your page. It can be slightly higher.

Starting from the oval, draw the head in a bit of a light bulb fashion.

On either side of the head, beginning in the narrow part of the "light bulb", draw arks for the shoulders.

Add the ears.

Now some horns.

Oval eyes with inner circles.

Draw a couple of angled nostrils in the oval.

Spot the face and body as you wish.

Trace your pencil marks with black marker, then erase the pencil lines.

Add patterns in your "spots" and horns.

We use One Zentangle A Day for pattern inspiration.

Adding Zentangle details.

Use Oil Pastels to color the background and accents on the cows.

And there you have it! An oil pastel/zentangle cow. Moooooo!

 

Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved. Please do not reproduce our text, images or patterns without prior written consent. Please contact us with any questions.

Photos 3-6-14

A Mouse in the House

Have you ever wondered what goes on in a Mouse House? Believe it or not, I have. Although I'm not particularly partial to sharing my house with mice, I do think they are quite adorable and ponder their little lives.

If I suspect mice have taken up residence in my house, I set live traps and, if caught, I take them out to fields, always making sure to set them free in the same spot, so they can reunite with long lost siblings. In another house, in another lifetime, my house was against a large woods. Every fall, when the winds were laced with the heady scent of autumn, field mice began inspecting local real estate to find the perfect place to winter.

Knowing this, one Fall I had set out a trap, and caught a beautiful brown mouse. I put him in an old aquarium, and reset the trap. Five minutes later, there was another mouse with gray fur. I left the trap out the rest of the day. I figured I'd catch a few more and release them together. While I waited, I couldn't be a rude hostess, so I offered my little mousey friends some food and drink. And I listened to them chat.

The next morning, when I hadn't caught another mouse, I decided I was ready to take these two cuties for a ride to the country. As I looked at the mice, I noticed one was signaling me closer. I pressed my ear against the glass, and I swear I heard him say, "Nice lady, could we possibly stay with you this winter?" When I looked into his beady little eyes, how could I say no? The preschool class I taught would be starting in a couple weeks. Couldn't "George" and "Gracie" become class pets?

But, oh... although I would gladly keep two mice, it's been my experience that at least 50% of the time you wind up with more than 2 mice! That would be a problem. Then I got a brilliant idea! As an aside... it's also been my experience, that many of my brilliant ideas... AREN'T.

I listened as the phone rang.

Her: Good morning. Timberline Veterinary Clinic, may I help you?

Me: Hi there. This is Kimara Wise. I have a question.

Her: Hi, Kimara. What's up?

Me: I just caught 2 field mice and I want to know how much would it cost to have them neutered?

Me: Hello?

Me: Hello?

Me: Excuse me, are you laughing?

Her: I'm sorry. I must not have heard you correctly. Did you ask me how much it would cost to neuter 2 field mice?

Me: Yes. Is there something wrong with that?

Her: Oh, honey, I don't even know where to start!

It was then explained to me that they didn't have equipment small enough to perform surgery on field mice, that the cost would be prohibitive even if they did, and that field mice had a very short life expectancy. I was also told about all the potential diseases field mice could carry.

Her: But, if you like, ((tst)) I could have you ((snicker)) speak to ((giggle)) the vet. ((chortle))

I thanked her for her time, and then explained to the 2 mice, without the snickering and chortling, that I couldn't keep them. So, I threw together a little snack for them for to nosh on later, put them in the car, and took them for a drive.

After that, I've often thought of George and Gracie. Wondered how they faired, where they settled and how many children they had. I wondered if Gracie kept a tidy home and if George was partial to reading the paper after dinner.

And, I tried to ignore the snickers and the back of the hand suppressed giggles that greeted me each time I took my pups to Timberline Veterinary Clinic.

Her: (Whispering to the new intern.) There's the lady that asked us to neuter 2 field mice!

The Cat and Mouse banner can be found HERE.
 

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